Getting Certified

Whether you are starting from scratch, need certification of your current system, or want to change certification providers, the following steps will outline all you need to do.

  1. Make Contact:
    Contact Southpac and tell us what you need. We’ll then give you a clear and transparent quote detailing the cost and time involved.

  2. Meet Your Assessment Team:
    We’ll assign you a Lead Auditor, who will be your main point of contact through the process – and beyond. They’ll have an excellent understanding of your business area and will support you as you move forward to the assessment and certification of your management system.

  3. Consider Training:
    Whether you’re seeking to implement a management system, would like to increase your general awareness of the standards or want to learn how to audit your own system, there are a range of training courses available. All certified clients receive complimentary access to Southpac’s online standards training courses.

  4. Stage 1 Audit:
    We’ll do an initial audit of your management system, and identify any omissions or weaknesses that need resolving before progressing to a full certification audit.

  5. Stage 2 Audit:
    We’ll conduct an audit of your operation against the relevant standard. This is also a value adding exercise as we can help you to identify potential weaknesses and opportunities for improvement within your own system.

  6. Certification and Beyond:
    Once the audit has been successfully completed, we’ll issue a certificate of registration, clearly explaining the scope of your management system. The certificate is valid for three years, and your lead auditor will visit you regularly to help you make sure you remain compliant, and support you in the continual improvement of your systems.

Transferring Certification

If you already hold management system certification with another provider you are free to transfer your certification to Southpac. Transferring certification is a simple and straightforward process, speak to one of our helpful team to find out how you can start benefiting from our services right away.

 

1 month ago

Southpac Aerospace
From all across the world, our aviation professionals come to Southpac to learn from the best to gain exceptional auditing skills.

From all across the world, our aviation professionals come to Southpac to learn from the best to gain exceptional auditing skills. ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

Southpac Aerospace
Getting creative in Brisbanes Systems for Continual Improvement course.   Learning ways to think outside the norm to come up with the best ideas.   

Traceys group design for an innovative work place.  And yes that includes a dog and a helipad!

Getting creative in Brisbane's Systems for Continual Improvement course. Learning ways to think outside the norm to come up with the best ideas.

Tracey's group design for an innovative work place. And yes that includes a dog and a helipad!
... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

Southpac Aerospace
Fun in Melbourne on the Systems for Continuous Improvement Course. 
Creativity was running hot in the design for an innovative workspace.

Fun in Melbourne on the Systems for Continuous Improvement Course.
Creativity was running hot in the design for an innovative workspace.
... See MoreSee Less

3 months ago

Southpac Aerospace
The old and the new .........

Douglas DC-3 –232A with Wright Cyclone engines was built in 1938 and shipped to Melbourne where ANA had paid $64,800 for her to commence revenue flights in Oct 1938. She was configured for 21 passengers and named ‘KANANA’ meaning ‘quiet. Captain P.T. Taylor was the first pilot to fly her for ANA.
In 1939 she was seconded to the RAAF and markings changed to full camouflage. 1940 returned to ANA ( Ansett ) where in 1972 she was extensively damaged in a forced landing south of Browning following an engine failure.
She was eventually rebuilt and is now used for the occasional charter. Has about 75,000 flying hours on the clock. (photo taken at Tullamarine Airport 15.02.17 by Libby)

The old and the new .........

Douglas DC-3 –232A with Wright Cyclone engines was built in 1938 and shipped to Melbourne where ANA had paid $64,800 for her to commence revenue flights in Oct 1938. She was configured for 21 passengers and named ‘KANANA’ meaning ‘quiet'. Captain P.T. Taylor was the first pilot to fly her for ANA.
In 1939 she was seconded to the RAAF and markings changed to full camouflage. 1940 returned to ANA ( Ansett ) where in 1972 she was extensively damaged in a forced landing south of Browning following an engine failure.
She was eventually rebuilt and is now used for the occasional charter. Has about 75,000 flying hours on the clock. (photo taken at Tullamarine Airport 15.02.17 by Libby)
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

What a beautiful old girl. I remember working on her during my apprenticeship and flying around on her.

4 months ago

Southpac Aerospace
All smiling faces for the team at Asia Pacific Aerospace undertaking Human Factor training. 

APA get to work on the famous GE T700 engine as well as many others.

All smiling faces for the team at Asia Pacific Aerospace undertaking Human Factor training.

APA get to work on the famous GE T700 engine as well as many others.
... See MoreSee Less

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